• 16 May 2016
  • News
  • Aria Miran

Tesla’s Model S is an impressive car. Free from internal combustion and its inherent inefficiencies, the fastest Model S does 0-60 in Ferrari times – just 2.8 seconds.

I’ve personally driven a Model S, and a flat-out 0-60 run is a magical thing. Your brain pauses for an instant and you are already going too fast for comfort.

Some German teens found out the hard way that even though the Model S has impressive acceleration, it’s not designed to fly. In fact, an 18 year old girl nailed the throttle a bit too hard and lost control on a tight curve, flying the vehicle about 80 feet through the air before it came to a rest.

Model S coming in for a crash landing. Miraculously, nobody was killed.

Impressively, nobody sustained life-threatening injuries in this incident. This can likely be chalked up to the Tesla’s massive front crumple zone – without the need for a traditional engine, there is much more empty space to absorb the force of an impact in a car crash.

Of course, as an Orange County personal injury lawyer I see a lot of breathless stories on the internet about “uninjured” people surviving crashes like this. The truth is that most of these teens will likely end up suffering some type of life-long disability as a result of this reckless driving, because many injuries cannot be diagnosed without detailed imaging studies that are usually not performed in an emergency room.